Healthy lifestyle choices in the Arctic

| Type artikkel: Forskningsprosjekt
Healthy living, nutrition and food waste in the Barents region.

Organisasjon:

NIBIO

Start/slutt august 2015/august 2017
NIBIOs prosjektansvarlig Hilde Margrethe Helgesen
Divisjon Divisjon for matproduksjon og samfunn
Fagområde Økonomi og samfunn
Samarbeidspartnere Norge: Nofima, Finland: University of Oulu, Russland: Northern Arctic Federal University og Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk
Finansieringskilde Nordisk Ministerråd/The Nordic Council of Ministers`Arctic Co-operation Programme 2015-2017
Hvor Norge, Finland og Russland

Sammendrag

Arctic populations within the participating countries Russia, Norway and Finland meet a number of similar climatic and settlement challenges with possible negative effects on public health and the environment. The rapid shift in parts of Russia, Finland and Norway from use and knowledge of local food resources to an urban lifestyle and diets, such as in mining and oil export oriented communities with high salaries or living long periods (3-6 months) in hotels, may change food consumption towards a less healthier and sustainable diet. Because Norway and Finland already have relevant experience both in research, regulations and policies such as in the Nordic Plan of Action on better health and quality of life through diet and physical activity and other plans/strategies, we consider it valuable for the artic population to be aware of and hopefully also able to utilized some of this knowledge and successful solutions. By active participation of selected population groups in Russia in learning lab processes, within think tanks, public consultations and workshop (as described in the communication plan) the need for knowledge and exchange of experience, will be met.

The public health in the Arctic regions of the Nordic countries and Russia are threatened by a number of life style related factors. The rapid shift in parts of Russia, Finland and Norway from use and knowledge of local food resources to an urban lifestyle and diets, such as in mining and oil export oriented communities with high salaries or living long periods (3-6 months) in hotels, may change food consumption towards a less healthier and sustainable diet. Because Norway and Finland already have relevant experience both in research, regulations and policies such as in the Nordic Plan of Action on better health and quality of life through diet and physical activity, the intention is to spread relevant parts of this knowledge to the rest of the Artic population.

Understanding how Nordic and in particular Artic foods and diet can contribute to a healthier lifestyle is of the utmost importance for preventing lifestyle induced diseases in a healthy population as well as in combating existing diet-related conditions. Alcohol is a part of these Northern eating habits and is included as well. The formal institutions like regulation as well as informal institutions like alcohol consumption habits, socioeconomic patterns and knowledge and economic opportunities vary across Nordic and North-West Russian countries and culture. Both the type and the quantity of the food, lifestyle and alcohol differ between Artic cultures – historically and today and so does the share of bio-waste being about 20-30% of all the wastes generated in households. The removal of this food loss would have remarkable effect on food demand and would reduce environmental impacts and stress on land use in the Artic area.

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